Research UNIX v9

v9 on TME

This just in, I have just booted Research UNIX v9 on TME’s SUN-3 emulator!

And there we are booted up and logged in.. pardon the disk error..

funinthe

I’m slightly hesitant about uploading it, as it clearly isn’t right… And this is only the binary component, I have integrated the source tree onto the disk image.  But I haven’t actually tried to compile anything except a simple hello-world program.  You can download it here from sourceforge: SUN3-research_v9.7z  If anyone want’s to browse the source, it’s on my CVS browser thing.

Solaris 9 x86 on VMware

(Note this is a guest post from Tenox)

Despite having an unofficial and experimental support for some time now I was not able to install Solaris 9 on VMware Workstation. I have recently upgraded to Workstation 9.0 and Lorenzo Gatti send me a link to complete Solaris 9 x86 u5 media kit so I had an excuse to retry.

After several tries I have determined that the easiest route is to boot and install from cd1 instead of the install disk. Also make sure to select VESA driver instead of standard VGA to get a decent resolution. VMware tools won’t install but it’s not a big deal. Apart from that everything else including networking works out of the box.

solaris9vm

Just as a final note Solaris 9 is now 10 years old, time flies fast!

Update:
I have also installed Solaris 8 in a similar manner. Unfortunately it doesn’t have VESA drivers so all I could get is 640×480.

solaris8vm

AMIX

AMIX Ad
AMIX Ad

Back in 1990 Commodore took the Amiga in a new direction with it’s new Amiga 3000, by commissioning a port of A&T SYSV Unix to the Amiga. Taking advantage of the 3000’s 68030 CPU and 68881 Math coprocessor, along with its integrated SCSI controller. It certainly was the hallmark of typical UNIX machines of the time.

When originally announced there was some big interest in the platform by SUN, as their original SUN-1, SUN-2 & SUN-3 lines of workstations were all 68000 based machines, and being able to rebrand a mass produced Commodore model would have been a good thing, however the deal ultimately fell through.  The machine would have been the Amiga 3500, which later became the Amiga 3000T.

Another thing to keep in mind is that SUN’s SYSV (Solaris) was targeted to the SPARC processor, and it is unlikely that they would benefit from selling a 68030 based machine in 1991.

Typical of the time, AMIX installs from a set of boot floppies, and then pulls the rest of the installation from a tape drive, such as the A3070.

AMIX was released at a time when the UNIX world was rapidly moving to RISC processors, SUN had their SPARC, SGI had their MIPS, IBM and their POWER, Motorola built UNIX machines around their 88000 RISC processor, NeXT was also going to move to the 88000 until they gave up making their own hardware and shifted to a software company.  So who would want a then dated 68030 based machine when the industry had made their first steps into the world of RISC computing.

So how does it measure up?  Well it is SYSV, and if you’ve seen one, well honestly you’ve seen them all.  What is kind of neat is that AMIX includes OpenLook and a C compiler, which is kind of a rarity for the period.

Another flaw was that when the 68040 processor was released it’s MMU was incompatible with the 68030, and the VM subsystem for any UNIX would have to be rewritten.  While NetBSD can run on both the 68030 and 68040, AMIX never was updated, and so it can only run on 68030 based machines.

AMIX never did get any critical traction, and slipped into oblivion with the death of Commodore.

Up until recently it was impossible to run AMIX in any emulator, but there has been a lot of work on the ARANYM and Pervious emulators which included doing 68030 MMU support for the possibility of running early versions of NeXTSTEP. Toni Wilen was able to adapt their work onto WinUAE and it is not possible to run AMIX.!

Reading through this thread,  I was able to put together the needed bits, and get it running under CrossOver, by using the pre-configured settings for WinUAE, and replacing the exe with the new beta exe, the supplied hard disk image from amigaunix.com and I was up and running in no time!  The only real change from the config was to change the SCSI ID of the hard disk from 0 to 6.

Screen Shot 2013-01-13 at 8.48.54 PM
AMIX starting up on WinUAE

The default password is wasp.  I thought it was kind of interesting that AMIX includes ‘dungeon’.  really cool!

Open Look on AMIX
Open Look on AMIX

I am unsure of how to enable the high resolution graphics, but sadly the Amiga known for its multimedia capabilities, AMIX with stock graphics runs in monochrome.  Such a major underwhelming thing.

Oh well, for anyone inclined you can now run AMIX, and enjoy another dead SYSV.

Fun with INTERACTIVE UNIX

(please note that this is a guest post from Tenox)

ix30

I’ve been hunting for a complete INTERACTIVE UNIX System for past 12 years or so. While I had the basic set of it for a good bit of time, no one seem to have have the real stuff – Looking Glass graphical environment. In November I got my hands on a box containing a massive set of 50 5.25″ floppy disks. There is the first time you can look on the GUI:

Through the looking glass..

The fun really begins with this page:
http://www.sun.com/software/solaris/Interactive/
As of 2010 it has an Oracle logo and tells about an operating system by Sun Microsystems (now Oracle) for which support ended just 4 years earlier. In reality the OS was rather little known to the general population.


SunSoft INTERACTIVE UNIX 4.1

First introduced by Kodak in 1985 was mostly used for specialized applications. Later Sun bought it to help porting Solaris to x86 platform. Enough of history.

Version 3.0 presented here unfortunately only works on Bochs 2.4.2. There are some issues with the IDE/ATA controller that make it boot up only every second time while clicking on reset button. Version 4.x has issues partitioning disks under VMware but I’m sure this can be worked around.

The installation is straight forward once you have correct settings for the emulator (bochsrc.bxrc included). With this blog post included is a fully working, ready installed system, just double click run.bat. If it hangs, click on the Reset button. The root password is root. To shutdown the system cleanly type “init 0”, but this must be done from the text mode console.

I’ve spent a bit of time trying to bring it to a higher resolution but so far I only managed 800×600. You have a number of graphics drivers available under the “xconfig” program. One of the most curious features of Looking Glass are the icons. Some of them ROTFLMAO.

Icons

The next task will be to install and configure networking. But this is for another post.

Update:

Unfortunately the floppy disk is all but unreadable.