Running CP/M on the Commodore 64!

 

CP/M cartridge retail box

Back in 1983 there was this great idea of expanding the Commodore 64 with the then popular (but declining) base of serious business software from the CP/M side of the world by creating a cartridge with a z80 processor inside, and a special port of the CP/M operating system that would take over the C64 letting you run real programs like Fortran, Cobol and the far better (and updated) Microsoft Basic v5!

However as always the major failing of CP/M was the massively different and incompatible diskettes of every platform.  The Commodore 64, lacking in RS-232 ports, and it’s incredibly incompatible 1541 drive rendered it nearly impossible for the average home user to transfer any programs in the specially formatted CP/M diskettes for the cartridge.  Not being able to read a standard 1541 diskette would prove to be it’s undoing.

While messing around in Vice, I saw that this cartridge is emulated now!  A quick search led me to zimmers.net where I was able to then locate the needed cpm.d64.gz, and I was booted up into CP/M and of course that hit the first snag which is of course, where is the software?

Well another search brought me to the package ‘ctools‘ which I quickly built on the Linux subsystem for Windows (I had to add -fpermissive to get it compile..), and now I could take that CP/M diskette delete the contents, and for the heck of it insert in Zork.. Of course where to find Zork along with other CP/M software?  The zip zork123_80.zip can be located on retroarchive.org, even fun things like Microsoft BASIC v5.21 (Interpreter), along with the manual.

CP/M only recognized a single drive, so you have to swap diskettes (Such a typical Commodore 64 experience), and here we go!

via Vice

Naturally the Commodore 64’s 40 column mode is… terrible.

However even back in 1984, a fine program aptly called soft80.com sets up the Commodore 64 in high resolution graphics mode, and emulates an 80 column mode.  Even better, the magic for the most part happens on the 6502 side, meaning it doesn’t take away from the precious memory on the CP/M side.

Zork 1 under CP/M / Soft80

Its worth noting that although Infocom games are dreadfully slow on the Commodore 64, playing under CP/M is also dreadfully slow, taking some 10-15 seconds to complete a command.

At least under emulation there is the warp mode.  And what took an hour to put together would have been months no doubt in the 1980’s ending in the CP/M cartridge going into a drawer to never be seen again.

A Z80 on a cart is pretty interesting.  It would have been interesting if other CPUs had made their way, a 68000 would have been interesting to have bridge the 8 bit world out, or even if Commodore had tried to put an 8088 onto that card, as early PC’s were nowhere near the 640kb hard disk wielding monsters they would become much later.  Naturally one could only dream of the power of an 80386 or the once vaunted NS32016

BBC releases its computer history archive

I thought it was somewhat worth mentioning that the BBC was releasing their old Computer Literacy Project Archive.  Although they for some reason never released any of their materials to the colonies and or territories, so although I’ve never seen any of this stuff, I’m sure others know far more about it.

I’m kind of surprised they didn’t keep this kind of thing up, although I guess after David Braben made it a priority again, and the Raspberry Pi was born, completing the cycle of the birth of Elite!

DooM for the VIC 20

I just found out about this one, it’s DooM! … on an 8bit.  No really!

I was watching this video of the 8bit guy, and (jump to 19:20) he quickly mentions DooM on the VIC 20.

Over on Denial, The Commodore Vic 20 Forum  Kweepa did the seemingly impossible by using cc65 and some assembly for a somewhat cut down (haha!) DooM on the 8bit.  The source is even available on github.

It has cut down the video rendering obviously, but still has some of the C enemy AI logic, it’s a bit more like Wolf in that there is no height in the cut down levels, but wow it’s still amazing to see.  The sound effects were re-cut from the PC speaker stuff, and yes, even reduced versions of the MIDI music make the cut!

Naturally this won’t run on a stock 20, rather you need to get the maximum 37kb of RAM, and it requires a floppy disk drive.

It’s really cool to check out, and yes it runs on VICE.

I’m more so surprised that this didn’t ignite more 6502, or other non 32bit machine versions of DooM.  You can find download information for the d64 image here, and a direct link here.

NES emulator written in JAVASCRIPT.

Well I guess we have officially crossed the bridge, where multiple Ghz machines can run scripts that can emulate a 1.8Mhz 6502 in realtime.

behold JNES.

And frankly the bigger thing to behold is just how FAST Google chrome is at java script. On my Intel Centrino laptop the google benchmark (http://v8.googlecode.com/svn/data/benchmarks/v5/run.html) scores 105 in Internet Explorer 8, while Google Chrome scores 3330.

That’s not a typo, Google Chrome is more then 31x faster than IE at executing Java Script.

I’ve got to find out where that whole NaCL thing went to, and where it is.

But seriously, go check it out! Mario in a browser without flash!