Win32s version tour…

Well I’ve managed to track down quite a few versions of Win32s from my various compiler CD’s So I figured it’d be somewhat interesting to run down a ‘tour’ of some of the significant versions starting with the first.

Now Microsoft Knowledge base article, KB121091 tells you which version of the win32s subsystem is installed by checking the win32s.ini or the version stamp of the WIN32S16.DLL file. Which for the most part is pretty simple. However the first version of Win32s that I could find doesn’t include either.

Win32s from October 1992.

I got this from the Windows NT October 1992 Win32 SDK. Keeping in mind that Windows 3.1 shipped in April of 1992 it’s kind of note worthy that already in October there is already a working win32s upgrade for Windows. I’d describe this release a a ‘core’ only version as all the win32s programs I have failed to run on this version. Mostly because this version lacks WINMM.DLL (the Multimedia library from NT), although the October 1992 Windows NT beta does include this dll, along with soundblaster/AdLib support!

Windows 3.1 - win32s 1992 running nt october 1992 appletts

Windows 3.1 – win32s 1992 running NT October 1992 applets

I was able to get a few of theapplets from Windows NT October 1992 running on this version of Win32s by simply expanding and copying them over.. The font selection for the digital clock was messed up, but the analog version worked fine. As you can see I got clock, freecell, notepad, solitaire and winver running. Needless to say the build 34326 is totally incorrect.

For anyone that wants to play with it, the 1992 version of Win32s is available here.

The next, and final beta from March of 1993. This one does identify itself as being build 61, which is not on the list.

Windows-3.1-win32s-March-1993-running-nt-october-1992-appletts

Windows 3.1 win32s from March 1993 running NT October 1992 applets

It’s compatibility is about par with the 1992 version, but the winver reports Windows NT version 63.10 … I’ve made it available here.

I was unable to find any 1.0 versions of Win32s. Googling around, it would appear that MathCad 4.0 shipped with the 1.0 runtime. If anyone has Mathcad 4.0 I’d love a copy of it’s Win32s 1.0!

From the same InfoWorld article, 1.1 shipped the same time as Windows NT 3.1, and 1.0 was another ‘pre-release’. But I do have to say that 1.1 includes quite a number of great utilities, and tools, unlike the other development versions.

Win32s 1.1

Win32s 1.1

Win32s 1.1 dev features

Win32s 1.1 dev features.

That’s right, this developer version includes the CLI Visual C++ compiler (Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 8.00), along with a profiler, and codeview debugger! Also included is a demo version of the Pharlap TNT Dos Extender, which is restricted to no user DLL’s and 2MB of RAM. Although if anyone really wants a kick ass Dos Extender, use the excellent, and FREE HX Dos Extender

Once WinG is installed, Lemmings will run on 1.1, while WinDoom fails because the procedure CreateDIBSection does not exist in this version of Win32s. Which really isn’t that surprising as version 1.1 is at parity with Windows NT 3.1, and that call didn’t get implemented until Windows NT 3.5 . Another fun thing is that because of the segmentation in Windows 3.1 it seems that a lot of stack ‘issues’ and other memory collisions are found much easier under Win32s then under Windows NT (and it’s siblings). At any rate, you can find this version of Win32s here.

Next is version 1.20 which includes support for OLE 2.0 . This brings Win32s up to the level of Windows NT 3.5 . And it allows more NT applications to run on Windows 3.1, including Word 6.0 for Windows NT. The development copy of Win32s 1.20 can be found here, along with the retail version here.

The developers version of 1.25 is on the Visual C++ 2.2 disc, but it lacks dev tools and debuggers from 1.10!  The retail copy of 1.25 with OLE2 support. There apparently was some major bugs with 1.25, and there is also the all important 1.25a update, which I’ve been able to track down both the retail and the retail + OLE2 versions. I don’t have any development versions of 1.25/1.25a so no debug symbols.

And finally I was able to track down Win32s 1.30a both retail OLE 2 & the development version, along with the final version of Win32s 1.30c, development and retail OLE 2.0.

Win32s 1.30 included a Windows 95 compatible help engine. I would imagine it included some level of compatibility for Windows 95 applications too.

Of all the versions, I’ve found that 1.25a is the most well behaved, but at the same time, I’m lacking the debug build of it… I should also point out gabby.de has a great info page on various applications that’ll run on Win32s.

** As a note from the future it turns out that 1.30c build 172 can play nicely under Qemu, it turns out to need a fix, from Roy as mentioned down below.  “I can patch all 1.30.xxx versions by replacing “66 83 EF 04 E3 3B” with “66 83 EF 04 EB 3B” in win32s16.dll“.  Super thanks for that!  I mirrored the fix here.

Lemmings demo for Win32s

Lemmings on Windows Vista

Lemmings on Windows Vista

While digging around I came across this demo of Lemmings for WinG/Win32s. And what’s great is that it runs on Windows 7 x86_64! Pretty snazzy!

The game play is still there, but the ‘speed up’ stuff is instant in the world of Ghz CPUs.

Oh well, it’s worth having some fun with. Here is the download.

I just remember this game when it was an Amiga thing…

WinDoom, WinG, Win32s on Windows 3.1 (on Qemu)

So since I was looking at the Doom stuff, I thought I’d try to track down the WinG version of Doom, and luckily someone pack ratted away two versions! Needless to say the older one didn’t work for me, but the last one, the April 13th, 1995 build, worked just great!

WinDoom on Windows 7 x64

Even on Windows 7 x86_64, sp1!

So how much of a chore was this to run back in 1995, before Windows 95?

Well to start WinDoom requires a display capable of at least 256 colors. I thought I’d use Qemu for this, but this proved to be… exceptionally difficult to locate a satisfactory display driver. I know lots of people point to the SVGA.EXE update from Microsoft, that uses VESA extensions to drive the video. Oh sure it sounds great but this is what I got:

And.. corruption.

Ok, so you say, there is this great patch to enable better VESA support right?

Wrong.

Yeah. I also hunted down various cirrus drivers for the specifically emulated chip (I checked the source) and they were all consistently defective. So I tried using a lower chip driver from HP and amazingly the 640x480x16MM colors works! (well, works ‘enough’).

Installing the right driver.

It’s the GD5430 v1.25f, 640x480x16.8M

The next thing is that Doom in both MS-DOS and Windows are full 32bit executables. On the MS-DOS side, it relies on the DOS4G/W extender. For Windows, it relies on the then new Win32 standard, and Windoom was written to conform to the Win32s standard, meaning with an addon it can run on Windows 3.1, Windows 95, And Windows NT. I just fished around the internet and scored a copy of Win32s 1.25. I just remember this being a somewhat stable version.

Installing Win32s

Win32s installs pretty smooth, (as long as you remember the share.exe). Now we just need the WinG runtime to be installed. WinG was Microsoft’s first real attempt at high speed gaming video under Windows. From what I understand it kind of went down because it was ‘too difficult’, and buying DirectX seemed to be a better fit.

Setting the midi mapper.

Another thing I’ve found is that if you change the midi mapper from the default “Ad Lib” to “Ad Lib general”, you can at least get the midi working in Doom.

Once WinG is installed, then it’ll want to do some blit tests…

WinG calibrating.

And after that, we can even bump it up to glorious 640×400, something the initial MS-DOS version couldn’t do easily as VESA wasn’t a big standard with INSTALLED cards at the time, and it’d require lots of work from the iD team, where the move to Windows pushed all the peripheral development to the Vendors to work around Microsoft. Even to this day, it’s still a big deal with video and audio.

One thing that is cool about Qemu is that at compile time, you can put in adlib & soundblaster cards to give the ‘full’ Windows 3.1 multimedia experience. There is also GUS (Gravis Ultra Sound) support
in Qemu, but I’ve never played with it..

With all of that out of the way, WinDoom will launch.

WING dispdib.dll missing error that turned out to be Video for Windows.

Then it’ll throw an error, because Windows 3.1 doesn’t have the same video backend as Windows NT 3.5 (and higher), hit ok and then …

And it works! WinGDoom running on Windows 3.1 on Qemu!

Sadly on Windows 3.1 the sound effects do not seem to work, but overall it’s a GREAT little port, mostly because as it comes up on 16 years old, it still works, and with sound. I wish other OS’s could give this kind of support for legacy applications, even ones that had such a brief window of support.

Anyone crazy enough to even think of playing along can download the blob of software I used to get this going here (Updated on archive.org here: Windows-3.1-WING-doom)

I should also add if you want sound effects to work on WinDOOM you really should install the Video for Windows Runtime, and it’ll work… poorly on Qemu/SoundBlaster 16, but it does work!

Microsoft Fortran Powerstation 1.0

PowerStation Fortran for Windows 3.1

While going through my stuff, I did manage to find some diskettes for Microsoft FORTRAN PowerStation 1.0 …  I recall using this under Windows 3.1 but there was some reason we never really used it under Windows 95 & NT (Found it 9 years later!) …

So I loaded it up on a VM with Windows 3.1 and quickly found out why:  While it produces win32 exe’s they are built with pre-release tools, and will *NOT* work under any released version of Windows NT, (Yes, including Windows NT 3.1!!).

I’m sure others may find themselves down the path with failed exe’s that crash with:

RtlExAllocateHeap not found in ntdll.dll

Microsoft had a fix, named beta2fix.  It renamed the references to ntdll.dll into beta2.dll.  Which sounds fun, except the resulting exe’s DONT WORK. Nothing like a ‘solution’ that took missing references into exe’s that just crash.

Naturally the ‘fix’ is to upgrade to 4.0 which.. is impossible to find, or track down Compaq fortran, or even Intel fortran.  Or just run it in a MS-DOS/Windows 3.1 VM and be happy for emulation.

But I figured what the hell, perhaps it’s possible to replace some of the key parts with old versions of Visual C++ and use HX DOS as an extender instead of an ancient Phar Lap TNT.

Googling around, the issue lies with the linker, link32.exe.

Now on my Visual C++ 1.0 cd there is a link32.exe that just calls link.exe.  On the Visual C++ 2.0 & 4.0 CD’s there is no link32.exe.  Seeing that Visual C++ 1.0 just calls through I just made a ‘stub’ program to call link.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
void main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
char command[255];
int rc;
int j;

memset(command,0x0,sizeof(command));
sprintf(command,”link “);
j=1;
while(j<argc)
{
sprintf(command,”%s %s”,command,argv[j]);
j++;
}
printf(“running [%s]\n”,command);
rc=system(command);
printf(“return code was %d\n”,rc);
if(rc==-1)
{printf(“I think it’s too many nested DPMI things between TNT & whatnot\n”);}
}

Ok, it’s not work of art, but it’ll get the job done.  You’ll need some kind of MS-DOS 16 bit real mode compiler to build this thing.  I would imagine Watcom’s C++ compiler can still build 16bit dos realmode exe’s, or Borland has something in their museum thing.  I’m using QuickC for Windows in a Windows 3.0 VM…

Ok so now with our ‘link32.exe’ replacement, copy it into the f32\bin directory overwriting the existing one.

Next we will need the link.exe from Visual C++ 2.0 (or higher I figure), and copy that into the f32\bin directory, along with it’s needed files dbi.dll & msvcrt20.dll.

Next, download and unzip the HX runtime And you can either place it’s bin directory onto the fl32\bin, or unzip it to it’s own directory, and add a statement in your autoexec.bat adding it’s bin directory to the path.

Reboot to pickup the hxrt’s bin directory, unless you copied it’s bin into fl32\bin

Now we need to alter Visual C++ 2.0’s linker to run under MS-DOS. Simply run

pestub \f32\bin\link.exe

And now you should be able to run link.exe under MS-DOS.

Finally replace the libc.lib & kernel32.lib with ones from your Visual C++. Naturally these are in the \f32\lib directory. Visual C++ 2.0 will link without complaining, 4.0 gives some weird messages, but it still works.  I never did test Visual C++ 6.0 & beyond.

So building a simple ‘hello.for’ (mention in the prior blog post)

c:\F32>fl32 hello.for
Microsoft (R) FORTRAN PowerStation Optimizing Compiler Version 1.0
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp 1984-1993. All rights reserved.

hello.for
Microsoft (R) 32-Bit Incremental Linker Version 2.50
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1992-94. All rights reserved.

-out:hello.exe
-debug:none
-machine:i386
-base:0x00010000
-subsystem:console
-entry:mainCRTStartup
-stack:32768,4096
-defaultlib:libf.lib,libc.lib,kernel32.lib,ntdll.lib
hello.obj
running [link  -link @C:\TEMP\003635lk]
return code was 0

The only caveat here, is that because of HXDOS it *thinks* it’s running on Windows NT, (beta 2!) and will not run the bindmsf.exe program… Not that it mattered as it was broken. I suppose if I were more brave I could read the link file, and scan for a ‘-out’ and run pestub on the output.. But I don’t so you will have to.  Otherwise when you run hello.exe you’ll get:

This program cannot be run in DOS mode.

But running pestub.exe:

c:\F32>pestub hello.exe
pestub: hello.exe modified successfully

C:\F32>hello
HELLO!

Ok, so with all this work, we’ve managed to restore the basic functionality of Microsoft Fortran here.  Now the bigger question, will hello.exe run on say Windows Vista x64?

C:\Users\neozeed\dos\F32>ver

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6002]

C:\Users\neozeed\dos\F32>hello
HELLO!

Not to bad, eh?

Oh and onto zork:

c:\F32\DUNGEON>fl32 *.for
Microsoft (R) FORTRAN PowerStation Optimizing Compiler Version 1.0
Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp 1984-1993. All rights reserved.

ACTORS.FOR
BALLOP.FOR
CLOCKR.FOR
DEMONS.FOR
DEMONS.FOR(520) : warning F4999: RLIGHT : variable declared but not used
DEMONS.FOR(520) : warning F4999: RSER : variable declared but not used
DGAME.FOR
DGAME.FOR(781) : warning F4999: PROTCT : variable declared but not used
DMAIN.FOR
DSO.FOR
DSUB.FOR
DVERB1.FOR
DVERB2.FOR
GDT.FOR
MACHDEP.FOR
NOBJS.FOR
NP.FOR
NP.FOR(397) : warning F4999: DFLAG : variable declared but not used
NP.FOR(397) : warning F4999: QHERE : variable declared but not used
NP.FOR(507) : warning F4999: DFLAG : variable declared but not used
NP.FOR(780) : warning F4999: DFLAG : variable declared but not used
NP.FOR(1154) : warning F4999: DFLAG : variable declared but not used
NP.FOR(1277) : warning F4999: DFLAG : variable declared but not used
NP2.FOR
OBJCTS.FOR
ROOMS.FOR
ROOMS.FOR(1195) : warning F4999: F : variable declared but not used
SVERBS.FOR
VERBS.FOR
VILLNS.FOR
Microsoft (R) 32-Bit Incremental Linker Version 2.50
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp 1992-94. All rights reserved.

-out:ACTORS.exe
-debug:none
-machine:i386
-base:0x00010000
-subsystem:console
-entry:mainCRTStartup
-stack:32768,4096
-defaultlib:libf.lib,libc.lib,kernel32.lib,ntdll.lib
ACTORS.obj
BALLOP.obj
CLOCKR.obj
DEMONS.obj
DGAME.obj
DMAIN.obj
DSO.obj
DSUB.obj
DVERB1.obj
DVERB2.obj
GDT.obj
MACHDEP.obj
NOBJS.obj
NP.obj
NP2.obj
OBJCTS.obj
ROOMS.obj
SVERBS.obj
VERBS.obj
VILLNS.obj
running [link  -link @C:\TEMP\000731lk]
return code was 0

The exe works fine on Vista, and pestub will allow it to run on MS-DOS.

*NOTE that the fortran compiler will *NOT* run on Vista/XP/NT.  The compiler was also linked with bad libraries & linker and it just won’t work.  I doubt forcedos would help for 32bit NT systems as the phar lap stuff is all out of date.  However DOSBox will happy run the compiler.

I haven’t even tried to debug anything, as I figure the best environment would have been a virgin copy of PowerStation 1.0 running under Windows 1.0… I did say keep a copy right!!!