Synchronet / Synchterm BBS fun!

 

Well the last while I have ‘rediscovered’ the fun of BBS’ing. There is a resurgence of popularity of the Synchronet BBS software. The cool thing about it is the ease to setup the QWK messages (it just uses ftp!) and within 30 minutes of downloading and installing I had myself a node VERT’s quicknet!

You too can download your very own BBS software here.

There is even a GREAT terminal emulator suitably named Syncterm that completes the experence. It supports rsh, telnet, ssh, x/y/z modem and cool ANSI graphics!

Another exciting aspect of the whole thing is that you can easily link up USENET servers with this BBS software… And of course it provides some involved web server wirtten in javascript.
The source to the whole thing is GPL’d so there is some hope that this will allow BBS’s to continue out there for some time.
Oh yeah and I did get a VPS so I do plan on hosting some of the old files from vaxenrule.com .. In ther interim though you can connect to the ‘underground’ BBS @ 75.127.119.16 … You could telnet in with any old telnet client, but I’d suggest Syncterm!
—-
Update that address has long since passed it is now bbs.superglobalmegacorp.com …!

Proxmox VE

Well frankly I’ve been majorly disappointed with Microsoft’s latest offerings in the world of virtualization. Frankly it’s been one BIG step backwards in terms of management.

I mean check this well meaning blog on how “easy” it is to setup remote management. And of course for the most part it NEVER works.

I know this must be a major news flash to Microsoft but you see virtual servers are like mainframes. The zone 0 OS must be able to stand on it’s own, and have just enough to bootstrap the hypervisor and allow itself to be managed in a stand alone fashion. After all if it were in a domain, where do you think those domain controllers are? Yep they are Virtual machines! And how do you ‘manage’ a domain resource with no DC’s? The whole 2008 Hyper-V is a BIG miscalculation on Microsoft’s part. I hope they wake up and notice how they had a good thing and have destroyed it.

All this nonsense sent me searching for an alternative which I’m pretty sure I found a great blend of system emulation, and something like SUN containers for Linux. There is even a Debian etch based quick install version called Proxmox which incorporates KVM (The new Linux hypervisor) and OpenVZ. And of course it’s FREE!

The cool thing is that the main management works on a web page, the consoles can be controlled via a VNC viewer that uses JAVA, and it’s VERY quick to setup.

The system emulation KVM uses the core devices from Qemu so a lot of Qemu virtual machines will “just work” if you copy them over. If you are installing an OS onto the virtual machine the ‘easy’ way is with the physical CD, you can use ISO images, however they are awkard to use. You have to flag the VM to pause on startup switch over to the monitor page and issue the following command:

change ide1-cd0 /directory/isoimage.iso

then tell the emulator to start up with the ‘c’ command which will continue from the pause…. Yeah I know it’s not terribly eligant.

On the OpenVZ front, it’s FAST as there is no real emulated IO it’s native. So I decided to use the wiki template and setup a wikipedia mirror at home. If anyone feels as brave you too can find instructions here:

These are some of the table times to load:

601M pages.sql Query OK, 7,473,186 rows affected, 8 warnings (5 min 10.52 sec)
837M revision.sql Query OK, 7,473,200 rows affected, 65535 warnings (2 min 11.84 sec)
18G text.sql Query OK, 7,473,202 rows affected, 1 warning (12 min 12.07 sec)
20M category.txt Query OK, 471,207 rows affected (13.14 sec)
1.8G categorylinks Query OK, 24,501,837 rows affected, 30177 warnings (28 min 28.31 sec)
5.6G externallinks Query OK, 36,492,925 rows affected (3 min 50.34 sec)
362M latestimage Query OK, 807,906 rows affected, 2 warnings (34.35 sec)
555M imagelinks Query OK, 18,615,721 rows affected (10 min 49.60 sec)
32k interwiki Query OK, 651 rows affected (0.08 sec)
186M langlinks Query OK, 5,780,509 rows affected (2 min 17.75 sec)
2G logging Query OK, 16,398,421 rows affected (2 min 51.75 sec)
45M oldimage Query OK, 118,449 rows affected (1.97 sec)
7.6G pagelinks Query OK, 270,641,297 rows affected (6 hours 12 min 4.83 sec)
104M redirect Query OK, 3,234,481 rows affected (23.71 sec)
1.2G template-link Query OK, 48,885,222 rows affected (50 min 7.08 sec)
68k user_groups Query OK, 3,947 rows affected (0.11 sec)

Even the ‘longest’ part here with the 270 million records took six hours… Not too bad! That’s still 12,122.88 TPS!

Also as a tip for anyone else crazy enough to do a sizable mediawiki (like wikipedia) or any single server wiki look to this page.

The upshot is that by loading this APC
extension into PHP and mediawiki load times for my cached site went from 2-5 minutes to 1-10 seconds.

The OpenVZ portion has various application templates that can be loaded into the zones from CentOS, Debian, Ubuntu, to pre configured applications like the media wiki and a few others.

If anything I’d say that proxmox is what I was hoping Microsoft’s Hyper-V could have been. A container version of windows with easy remote admin along with some system emulation could have made things MASSIVLY easier to deal with. It’s a shame they decided to go with this bizarre WMI based thing.

Hyper-V with Windows 2008 core

So I got a new Acer 5800 pc… CHEAP.. A quad core cpu, 4 gigs of ram and 600+ GB of diskspace for slightly over $500 CDN. Talk about POWER on the cheap!

So I wanted to load up the new Microsoft Hyper-V stuff, and check out the new “core” windows.

First this core thing is weird… And not very intuitive. I hope you are good with netsh!

Also, loading device drivers was a MAJOR pain. Let me say loading the marvel lan drivers was really strange until I came acrosss something about pnputil.

It would have been nice to have some kind of pop up help guild along with the CLI window so that us n00bs could have at least a guide as to what the hell is going on in server core.

Anyways for me the fun was:

pnputil -i -a yk60x64.inf

Then it worked like a champ. I know as time goes on, people will need this little tidbit on how to load device drivers on Windows 2008 core server. So I thought I’d put it out there.

Needless to say, i’m on the road, so I don’t have access to my Netware 3.12 CD, nor my Qemu VM so I can’t get into some kind of networking with Qemu thing like I want to. But I’ll do so soon. Honestly!

From what I hear about this Hyper-V is that it’s faster, and more feature filled then the prior versions of Virtual Server… I’ll have to see as now I’m loading the network drivers….

Oh, and another thing, is that all the services are IPv6 native, and Windows 2008 server, like Vista defaults to IPv6 then fails to IPv4. It seems like a good time for some 6to4 guides, or new DSL/WAP’ that do the 6to4 dance.

SimH 3.8 is out!

A new version of SIMH has been released!

You can check it out here. I’ve been on the road so no new compiles of it just yet, but I’ll do what I can.

At the moment I’m on an old computer that Visual C++ express 2008 is out of the question on running. A while ago there was the Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003, which has been nearly impossible to track down until I found its real name was VCToolkitSetup.exe

Using filewatcher, I managed to score a copy!

Check file watcher:

I’ve just downloaded it, so I have no idea how much other stuff I need to get to get it going, but I’m thinking a VC 2003 build of the exe’s along with HX DOS for the MS-DOS users ought to provide a good solution. HX DOS is awesome as it does what Pharlap TNT did back in the day, but it does more! And it’s free, no insane fee schedules like Pharlap TNT had… Frankly Pharlap slit their own throats by making their product so expensive. If it had been CHEAP/Free to developers, and cheap for distribution odds are nobody would be running windows…

Anyways for whatever reason, I get people downloading the MS-DOS builds of simh, and I figure this will make a good compromise as they can run the same build as everyone else. Looking at this refrence It should be possible to write a network driver using the old packet interface to have simh on MS-DOS live on the network… I’m not sure if I’ll actually do it, as I don’t know if people would want it… But then I’m still amazed that there are MS-DOS downloads from sourceforge… 22 of them, and I swear it’s not me!

Also I spotted this while it’s in Japanese I think it has some kind of guide and some simple examples of a ‘text mode’ windows program… It may be a good thing for some ancient windows/Windows CE simh stuff…

Just a thought at the moment, I can’t promise much.

SUA/SFU dropbear minor annoyances..

Well I just deployed a Windows server to run some ancient ASP stuff, and it just turned out that the new direction is going to be php & unix… Since the machine is now in a different nation changes will be… difficult.

So for now I thought I’d install the SFU package and just connect in thru that and set it up… Except SFU/SUA is all telnet remotely… Which is bad. However dropbear to the rescue has ‘fixed’ it, now I can ssh.

There is really one two tweaks, the first one requires you to change the utmp stuff to utmpx.. It’s really easy, just add the x to the structures!

The ‘challenge’ was to authenticate passwords. You cannot verify passwords the old way, but after a lot of digging around I found this page:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb463206.aspx

“Porting applications in C” ..

And for anyone that cares, here is the part for svr-authpasswd.c

/* the first bytes of passwdcrypt are the salt */
// testcrypt = crypt((char*)password, passwdcrypt);
// m_burn(password, passwordlen);
// m_free(password);

//This changes
//if (strcmp(testcrypt, passwdcrypt) == 0)
if(setuser(ses.authstate.pw_name,password,SU_CHECK)==0)

Yep, that’s it, and now gen your keys, and away you go!

Programming Objective C

Well I’ve been busy with work, and whatnot, however I’ve managed to get Frontier to render in colour now! And fix an annoyance in UAE on NeXTSTEP.

Someone pointed me to this:

NeXTSTEP 3.0

Simson Garfinkel seems to have released this awesome boook… At least I don’t feel like I’m flailing about in the dark now.

Also I’ve googled about and found that MAME has an OpenSTEP interface, which I’ll be taking apart to see if it “fits” more then the UAE one which sputters about too much for my liking.

Failing that I’ll have to break down and really learn to program in NeXTSTEP “properly”.

Frontier Elite II for NeXTSTEP

Well I couldn’t resist. Currently there is no keyboard input, but after hacking the ObjectiveC from UAE, I was able to get GLFrontier to compile and run it’s intoduction under NeXTSTEP 3.3 on VirtualBOX…

I guess I’ll have to break down and order some new hard disks, and a PCI video card to rebuild me a whitebox.

In the meantime, here is a two bit picture:

Image of Frontier Elite II on NeXTSTEP 3.3

Amiga Days

Do you remember the Commodore Amiga?

I certainly do!

While I was busy fiddling with my Commodore 64, a friend of mine got an Amiga in high school. The 64 was cool, but I was simply blown away by the Amiga. To say there was a gulf between the 8 bit machine, and the quasi 32/16 bit machine would be a massive understatement. His Amiga 2000 could do all kinds of neat things, from talk, run IBM XT software at 100% speed via a “bridge board”, not to mention play super snazzy games. It took me a few years to save up to buy my very own Amiga 500, and once I was ready I didn’t have enough money for a bus ride home, so I walked the FIVE miles home toting my Amiga! I was so happy to say the least!! (At least it was summer, it was flat, and there weren’t any tropical waves/hurricanes around…)

While there are a few emulation alternatives for running the old m68000 software on all kinds of machines, I’m going to talk about AROS today.

AROS is to AmigaDOS what Wine is to Windows. Once it became clear that Commodore was going to die, and that AmigaDOS and the Amiga were lost a few brave people decided that they had to take matters into their own hands. Sadly there was lots of in fighting, a tradition of the comp.sys.amiga.advocacy news group where some people get too tied into little details and let little things (like the rise of Microsoft Windows) pass them by. At any rate, Aaron Digulla knuckled down, and start to write a bug for bug clone of AmigaDOS 3.1 in C to run on the IBM PC. The result of which is AROS. It currently will either run hosted on Linux/NetBSD or natively on the i386. There is a port to the Amd64 undergoing right now. AROS even has SDL support.

So this got me thinking..

What if I were to remove all the OpenGL calls from GLFrontier, and ran it as a strictly 2d app on AROS?

So I took the first step, and I trimmed out the OpenGL support from Tom’s fix of Frontier, so it’s completely SDL 2d friendly, and cross compiled it to AROS. I built the first pass on MinGW, and got frame rates of upwards of 1000 on Vista 64!

Now for the fun part of building an AROS version. While there is now a native GCC for AROS it cannot compile the assembly listing from GLFrontier.. I suspect it’s a heap overflow. This means you have to cross compile. I have cygwin installed in a Windows 2000 VM I use with Virtual PC 2007. I’m not sure if cygwin installs on Vista, let alone Vista 64, however I do suspect it MAY have issues… I keep my dev stuff in a VM so I can move it around without losing my settings.

I downloaded and unpacked the following files into my cygwin installation:

i386-aros-cross-gcc-3.3.1-cygwin.zip

libsdl.a

And the SDL include directory from cygwin.. I think its SDL version 1.2

I did have to find all the ‘exe’ files and make sure they were chmoded +x as the compiler would not run (chmod +x /usr/local/bin/exe /usr/local/i386-aros/bin/ /usr/local/lib/gcc-lib/i386-aros/3.3.1/*exe ). Once you are ready you should be able to build files with

i386-aros-gcc

I’m not sure how to build stripped files, but I suspect it’s out there somewhere. At any rate, I did this to compile my SDL 2d version of FrontierGL:

$ cd as68k

$ make
gcc -O2 -g -Wall -c -o output.o output.c
gcc -O2 -g -Wall -c -o output_c.o output_c.c
gcc -O2 -g -Wall -c -o output_i386.o output_i386.c
output_i386.c:981:1: warning: “_S” redefined
In file included from output_i386.c:6:
/usr/include/ctype.h:35:1: warning: this is the location of the previous definition
output_i386.c: In function

x_loadea':
output_i386.c:1373: warning: 'out_reg' might be used uninitialized in this function
output_i386.c: In function
x_loadval’:
output_i386.c:1474: warning: ‘reg3’ might be used uninitialized in this function
output_i386.c:1474: warning: ‘out_reg’ might be used uninitialized in this function
gcc -O2 -g -Wall -c -o as68k.o as68k.c
as68k.c: In function `asm_pass1′:
as68k.c:663: warning: ‘size’ might be used uninitialized in this function
as68k.c:671: warning: ‘coutput_label’ might be used uninitialized in this function
gcc -O2 -g -Wall -c -o dict.o dict.c
gcc -O2 -g -Wall output.o output_c.o output_i386.o as68k.o dict.o -o as68k

$ cd ..

$ as68k/as68k.exe –output-i386 fe2.s
Pass 1
Pass 2
Done! 539337 bytes and 759 relocations.

$ i386-aros-gcc -c fe2.s.S

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c audio.c
audio.c: In function

Audio_Init':
audio.c:334: warning: passing arg 5 of
SDL_LoadWAV_RW’ from incompatible pointer type

$ cd src

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c hostcall.c

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c input.c

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c keymap.c

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c main.c

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c screen.c
screen.c: In function `draw_control_panel’:
screen.c:274: warning: assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast

$ i386-aros-gcc -O2 -I /usr/local/i386-aros/sys-include/sdl -c shortcut.c

$ i386-aros-gcc *.o ../fe2.s.o -lsdl -o ../frontier

$ cd ..

$ file frontier
frontier: ELF 32-bit LSB relocatable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), not stripped

$ i386-aros-size frontier
text data bss dec hex filename
2580672 2036 1422076 4004784 3d1bb0 frontier

*REMEMBER as68k has to actually run on the host machine, so it needs to be native, you cannot use a cross compiler for that. However you do cross compile it’s output.

Naturally you’ll now want to run your exe!

For testing the binaries you’ll need some kind of Aros system, I recommend WinAROS, it’s a pre-built Qemu package, so the disk will work on all kinds of platforms. You can download it here: WinAros Developer

This is a pretty snazzy setup, I recommend booting into a 32bit depth display option, however you will want to modify the default script to look like this at the last line:

qemu.exe -L . -m 256 -localtime -boot c -hda WinArosHD.img -no-kqemu -net nic -net user

The next thing you’ll want to do is enable the networking. I don’t know why it’s disabled by default, but with a few moments in the CLI, and edit you can have it running:

To get the network running you have to go into Extras:Networking/Stacks/AROSTCP/db and edit static-routes, netbd-myhost, and interfaces.

First edit interfaces and uncomment the line that has device prm-rtl8029 and change the IP to 10.0.2.15

Second edit netbd-myhost and make it look like this:
HOST 10.0.2.15 arosbox.arosnet arosbox
DOMAIN arosnet 10.0.2.
NAMESERVER 10.0.2.3

Third edit static-routes and change the address to 10.0.2.2

Last add the following line to your user-startup
Execute Extras:Networking/Stacks/AROSTCP/S/startnet.

Now reboot. Open a shell and verify that you have a connection with “ifconfig -a”
You can also try to ping a website, but you might not get any return packets because of QEMU’s built in firewall. You should at least see the ip address for the site you ping. Or ping 10.0.2.2 to make sure you network is communicating with Qemu.

Now for the final moment, put your exe on a web server, and simply use wget to get it! I’d recommend zipping up your work directory, so it includes the ‘bin’ file, and the structure that GLFrontier expects. I like the zip file format as WinAROS includes unzip.

I do the following from AROS

Wget http://192.168.1.10/front.zip
Unzip front.zip

It’s that easy! Now you can either ‘cd’ or click on your frontier, and away it should go!

The video is a bit wonky in that it seems to only work in 8 bit or 24bit depths. So far I’ve only tested this in WinArosDeveloper.

It actually works, the keyboard is buggy as hell, but you can play with the mouse. The first key code seems to work, then it gets stuck, so I recommend the ‘enter’ key so you can thrust…

I’ve published my zip up to The AROS Archives with any luck when it’s there I’ll update it with a link to it. In the mean time, I’ll provide a dump of the screen.c that I fixed to remove the OpenGL support. Naturally blogspot will screw up the formatting, however it should work…

#include
#include “main.h”
#include “../m68000.h”
#include “screen.h”

/* new stuff */
enum RENDERERS use_renderer = R_OLD;
int len_main_palette;
unsigned short MainPalette[256];
unsigned short CtrlPalette[16];
int fe2_bgcol;
int mouse_shown = 0;
unsigned long logscreen, logscreen2, physcreen, physcreen2;
unsigned long VideoBase;
unsigned char *VideoRaster;
unsigned int MainRGBPalette[256];
unsigned int CtrlRGBPalette[16];
int screen_w=320;
int screen_h=200;
BOOL bGrabMouse = FALSE;
BOOL bInFullScreen = FALSE;
SDL_Surface *sdlscrn;

static const unsigned char font_bmp[] = {
0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x2,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,
0x80,0x0,0x0,0x2,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x50,
0xf8,0x50,0x50,0xf8,0x50,0x0,0x0,0x6,0x20,0xf0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xf0,0x20,
0x0,0x5,0x0,0xc8,0xd8,0x30,0x60,0xd8,0x98,0x0,0x0,0x6,0xa0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x2,
0xc0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xc0,0x0,0x3,0xc0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,
0x40,0xc0,0x0,0x3,0x0,0x0,0x20,0xf8,0x50,0xf8,0x20,0x0,0x0,0x6,0x0,0x0,
0x40,0xe0,0x40,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x80,0x80,
0x0,0x2,0x0,0x0,0x0,0xc0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x3,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,
0x0,0x0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x2,0x0,0x8,0x18,0x30,0x60,0xc0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x6,
0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x40,0xc0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,
0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x20,
0x20,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x80,0x80,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x0,0x0,0x4,
0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x20,0x20,
0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x80,0x0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x2,0x0,0x0,
0x0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x2,0xe0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0x0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,
0xe0,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0x80,0x0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x4,
0xfe,0x82,0xba,0xa2,0xba,0x82,0xfe,0x0,0x0,0x8,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x90,
0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0xf8,0x88,0x88,0xf8,0x0,0x0,0x6,0xe0,0x80,
0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xf8,0x48,0x48,0x48,0x48,0x48,0xf8,0x0,
0x0,0x6,0xf0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,
0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xf0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xb0,0x90,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,
0x90,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xe0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,
0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xf0,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x90,0xb0,
0xe0,0xc0,0xe0,0xb0,0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0x88,0xd8,0xf8,0xa8,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x0,0x0,0x6,0x90,0xd0,0xf0,0xb0,
0x90,0x90,0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,
0xf0,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xb0,
0xf0,0x18,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0xe0,0xb0,0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x80,
0x80,0xf0,0x10,0x10,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xe0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x0,
0x0,0x3,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xb0,
0xe0,0xc0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x5,0x88,0x88,0x88,0xa8,0xf8,0xd8,0x88,0x0,0x0,0x6,
0x88,0xd8,0x70,0x20,0x70,0xd8,0x88,0x0,0x0,0x6,0x90,0x90,0x90,0xf0,0x20,0x20,
0x20,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xf0,0x10,0x30,0x60,0xc0,0x80,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,0xa0,0x0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x80,0xc0,0x60,0x30,0x18,0x8,0x0,
0x0,0x6,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0x4,0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,
0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0x0,0xf8,0x0,0x6,
0xa0,0x0,0xe0,0x20,0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0x20,0xe0,0xa0,
0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,
0xc0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xc0,0x0,0x0,0x3,0x20,0x20,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0x80,0x80,0xc0,
0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x3,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x20,0xe0,0x4,
0x80,0x80,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x80,0x0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,
0x80,0x0,0x0,0x2,0x40,0x0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0xc0,0x0,0x3,0x80,0x80,
0xb0,0xe0,0xe0,0xb0,0x90,0x0,0x0,0x5,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,
0x0,0x2,0x0,0x0,0xf8,0xa8,0xa8,0xa8,0xa8,0x0,0x0,0x6,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,
0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,
0xe0,0x20,0x30,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xc0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x3,0x0,0x0,
0xc0,0x80,0xc0,0x40,0xc0,0x0,0x0,0x3,0x80,0x80,0xc0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xc0,0x0,
0x0,0x3,0x0,0x0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xa0,0xa0,
0xe0,0xc0,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0x88,0xa8,0xf8,0xd8,0x88,0x0,0x0,0x6,
0x0,0x0,0xa0,0xe0,0x40,0xe0,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,
0xe0,0x20,0xe0,0x4,0x0,0x0,0xf0,0x30,0x60,0xc0,0xf0,0x0,0x0,0x5,0x81,0x8d,
0xe1,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x9,0x2,0x1a,0xc2,0x80,0xc0,0x40,0xc0,0x0,
0x0,0x8,0xfe,0xfc,0xf8,0xfc,0xfe,0xdf,0x8e,0x4,0x0,0x7,0x7f,0x3f,0x1f,0x3f,
0x7f,0xfb,0x71,0x20,0x0,0x8,0x4,0x8e,0xdf,0xfe,0xfc,0xf8,0xfc,0xfe,0x0,0x8,
0x20,0x71,0xfb,0x7f,0x3f,0x1f,0x3f,0x7f,0x0,0x7,0xff,0x81,0x81,0x81,0x81,0x81,
0x81,0xff,0x0,0x9,0x0,0x0,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x40,0xc0,0x4,0x60,0x0,
0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0x0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0x40,0xa0,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x40,0xa0,0xe0,0x20,
0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0x40,0xa0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,
0x40,0xa0,0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,
0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0x0,0xe0,0x20,0xe0,0xa0,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0xa0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xe0,0xa0,0xa0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0xa0,0xa0,0xc0,0xa0,0xa0,0xc0,0x0,
0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xc0,0xa0,0xa0,0xa0,
0xa0,0xa0,0xc0,0x0,0x0,0x4,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x0,0x0,0x4,
0xe0,0x80,0x80,0xe0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x0,0x0,0x4
};

static inline void read_m68k_vertex (int st_vptr, int output[3])
{
output[0] = STMemory_ReadLong (st_vptr);
output[1] = STMemory_ReadLong (st_vptr+4);
output[2] = -STMemory_ReadLong (st_vptr+8);
}

struct ZNode {
unsigned int z;
struct ZNode *less, *more;
void *data;
};

#define MAX_OBJ_DATA (2<<17) static unsigned char obj_data_area[MAX_OBJ_DATA]; static int obj_data_pos; #define MAX_ZNODES 1000 static struct ZNode znode_buf[MAX_ZNODES]; static int znode_buf_pos; static struct ZNode *znode_start; static struct ZNode *znode_cur; enum NuPrimitive { NU_END, NU_TRIANGLE, NU_QUAD, NU_LINE, NU_BEZIER_LINE, NU_TEARDROP, NU_COMPLEX_SNEXT, NU_COMPLEX_START, NU_COMPLEX_END, NU_COMPLEX_INNER, NU_COMPLEX_BEZIER, NU_TWINKLYCIRCLE, NU_PLANET, NU_CIRCLE, NU_CYLINDER, NU_BLOB, NU_OVALTHINGY, NU_POINT, NU_2DLINE, NU_MAX }; #define MAX_QUEUED_STRINGS 200 struct QueuedString { int x, y, col; unsigned char str[64]; } queued_strings[MAX_QUEUED_STRINGS]; int queued_string_pos; static bool no_znodes_kthx; /*********PROTOTYPES****************/ static void _BuildRGBPalette (unsigned int *rgb, unsigned short *st, int len); static void draw_3dview (struct ZNode *node); static int DrawChar (int col, int xoffset, char *scrline, int chr); static void Nu_DrawPrimitive (void *data); static inline int znode_rdlong (void **data); static void add_node (struct ZNode **node, unsigned int zval); static void znode_insert (struct ZNode *node, unsigned int zval); static inline void end_node (); static inline void znode_databegin (); static inline void znode_wrlong (int val); int DrawStr (int xpos, int ypos, int col, unsigned char *str, bool shadowed) { int x, y, chr; char *screen; x = xpos; y = ypos; if ((y > 192) || (y<0)) return x; set_line: screen = LOGSCREEN2; screen += SCREENBYTES_LINE * y; while (*str) { chr = *(str++); if (chr < 0x1e) { if (chr == '\r') { y += 10; x = xpos; goto set_line; } else if (chr == 1) col = *(str++); continue; } else if (chr == 0x1e) { /* read new xpos */ x = *(str++); x *= 2; continue; } else if (chr < 0x20) { /* Read new position */ x = *(str++); x *= 2; y = *(str++); goto set_line; } //if (x > 316) continue;

if (shadowed) {
DrawChar (0, x+1, screen+SCREENBYTES_LINE, chr-0x20);
}
x = DrawChar (col, x, screen, chr-0x20);
}

return x;
printf (“DrawStr [%s]\n”,str);
return 0;
}

void Nu_PutColoredPoint()
{}

void Nu_ComplexSNext()
{}
void Nu_DrawComplexSNext()
{}

void Nu_DrawComplexStart()
{}
void Nu_DrawComplexEnd()
{}

void Nu_ComplexStartInner()
{}
void Nu_DrawComplexStartInner()
{}
void Nu_ComplexBezier()
{}
void Nu_DrawComplexBezier()
{}

void draw_control_panel()
{
unsigned int *pal;
// Lock surface if needed
if (SDL_MUSTLOCK(sdlscrn))
if (SDL_LockSurface(sdlscrn) < 0) return; // Declare a couple of variables int y, x, yofs, ofs; // Draw to screen yofs = 0; pal=MainRGBPalette; for (y = 0; y < screen_h; y++) { if(y==168)pal=CtrlRGBPalette; //bottom has differnet palette for (x = 0, ofs = yofs; x < screen_w; x++, ofs++) { //((unsigned int*)sdlscrn->pixels)[ofs] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];

switch (sdlscrn->format->BytesPerPixel)
{
case 1: // 8-bpp
{
Uint8 *bufp;
bufp = (Uint8 *)sdlscrn->pixels + y*sdlscrn->pitch + x;
*bufp =(Uint8*) pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];
}
break;
case 2: // 15-bpp or 16-bpp
{
Uint16 *bufp;
bufp = (Uint16 *)sdlscrn->pixels + y*sdlscrn->pitch/2 + x;
*bufp = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];
}
break;
case 3: // 24-bpp mode, usually not used
{
Uint8 *bufp;
bufp = (Uint8 *)sdlscrn->pixels + y*sdlscrn->pitch + x * 3;
if(SDL_BYTEORDER == SDL_LIL_ENDIAN)
{
bufp[0] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];
bufp[1] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]] >> 8;
bufp[2] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]] >> 16;
} else {
bufp[2] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];
bufp[1] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]] >> 8;
bufp[0] = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]] >> 16;
}
}
break;
case 4: // 32-bpp
{
Uint32 *bufp;
bufp = (Uint32 *)sdlscrn->pixels + y*sdlscrn->pitch/4 + x;
*bufp = pal[VideoRaster[ofs]];
}
break;
}

}
//yofs += sdlscrn->pitch / 4;
yofs += sdlscrn->pitch / sdlscrn->format->BytesPerPixel;
}

// Unlock if needed
if (SDL_MUSTLOCK(sdlscrn))
SDL_UnlockSurface(sdlscrn);

// Tell SDL to update the whole screen
SDL_UpdateRect(sdlscrn, 0, 0, screen_w, screen_h);

//printf(“draw_control_panel\n”);
}

void Nu_DrawScreen()
{
_BuildRGBPalette (MainRGBPalette, MainPalette, len_main_palette);
_BuildRGBPalette (CtrlRGBPalette, CtrlPalette, 16);
//printf (“Frame: %d znodex.\n”,znode_buf_pos);
//draw_3dview (znode_start);
if (mouse_shown) {
SDL_ShowCursor (SDL_ENABLE);
mouse_shown = 0;
} else {
SDL_ShowCursor (SDL_DISABLE);
}
draw_control_panel();
//set_main_viewport();

//printf(“Nu_DrawScreen\n”);

}

void Nu_PutBezierLine()
{}
void Nu_DrawBezierLine()
{}

void Nu_3DViewInit()
{
queued_string_pos = 0;
//printf (“3dviewinit()\n”);
znode_buf_pos = 0;
//printf (“%d bytes object data\n”, obj_data_pos);
obj_data_pos = 0;

znode_start = NULL;
znode_cur = NULL;
no_znodes_kthx = FALSE;
}
void Nu_InsertZNode()
{
unsigned int zval = GetReg (4);
if (use_renderer == R_OLD) return;
if (no_znodes_kthx) return;
if (znode_start == NULL) {
add_node (&znode_start, zval);
} else {
znode_insert (znode_start, zval);
}
}

void Nu_PutCircle()
{}
void Nu_DrawCircle()
{}

void Nu_PutOval()
{}
void Nu_DrawOval()
{}

void Nu_PutCylinder()
{}
void Nu_DrawCylinder()
{}

void Nu_QueueDrawStr()
{}
void Nu_IsGLRenderer()
{
SetReg(0,0);
}

void Nu_PutPlanet()
{}
void Nu_DrawPlanet()
{}

void Nu_Put2Line()
{}
void Nu_Draw2Line()
{}

void Nu_PutQuad()
{}
void Nu_DrawQuad()
{}

void Nu_GLClearArea()
{}
void Nu_PutBlob()
{use_renderer=R_OLD;}
void Nu_DrawBlob()
{}

void Nu_Put2DLine()
{}
void Nu_Draw2DLine()
{}

void Nu_PutLine()
{}
void Nu_DrawLine()
{}

void Nu_UnInit()
{}

void Nu_PutTeardrop()
{}
void Nu_DrawTeardrop()
{}

void Nu_PutPoint()
{
printf(“Nu_PutPoint\n”);
}
void Nu_DrawPoint()
{}

void Nu_PutTwinklyCircle()
{}
void Nu_DrawTwinklyCircle()
{}

void Nu_ComplexStart()
{}

void Nu_PutTriangle()
{}
void Nu_DrawTriangle()
{}

void Nu_ComplexSBegin()
{}

void Nu_ComplexEnd()
{}

void Nu_32ViewInit()
{}

void Screen_ToggleRenderer ()
{
use_renderer = R_OLD;
}

void change_vidmode(void);

void Screen_Init(void)
{
change_vidmode();
SDL_WM_SetCaption(PROG_NAME, “Frontier”);
SDL_EventState(SDL_MOUSEMOTION, SDL_ENABLE);
SDL_EventState(SDL_MOUSEBUTTONDOWN, SDL_ENABLE);
SDL_EventState(SDL_MOUSEBUTTONUP, SDL_ENABLE);
SDL_ShowCursor(SDL_ENABLE);
use_renderer=R_OLD;
printf(“Screen_Init\n”);
}

void change_vidmode (void)
{
const SDL_VideoInfo *info = NULL;
int modes;

info = SDL_GetVideoInfo ();

assert (info != NULL);

modes = SDL_SWSURFACE;// SDL_ANYFORMAT | (bInFullScreen ? SDL_FULLSCREEN : 0 );

if ((sdlscrn = SDL_SetVideoMode (screen_w, screen_h,
info->vfmt->BitsPerPixel, modes)) == 0) {
fprintf (stderr, “Video mode set failed: %s\n”, SDL_GetError ());
SDL_Quit ();
exit (-1);
}
printf(“change_vidmode %d x %d %d deep\n”,screen_w,screen_h,info->vfmt->BitsPerPixel);
}

void Screen_UnInit(void)
{}
void Screen_ToggleFullScreen()
{
}

static void _BuildRGBPalette (unsigned int *rgb, unsigned short *st, int len)
{
int i;
int st_col, r, g, b;

for (i=0; i>4;
rgb[i] = 0xff000000 | (b<<16) | (g<<8) | (r); } } static int DrawChar (int col, int xoffset, char *scrline, int chr) { const char *font_pos; char *pix; int i; font_pos = font_bmp; font_pos += (chr&0xff)*10; scrline += xoffset; if (xoffset < 0) { font_pos += 9; return xoffset + *font_pos; } for (i=0; i<8; i++, font_pos++, scrline += SCREENBYTES_LINE) { pix = scrline; if (xoffset > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x80) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+1 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x40) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+2 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x20) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+3 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x10) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+4 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x8) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+5 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x4) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+6 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x2) *pix = col;
pix++;
if (xoffset+7 > 319) continue;
if (*font_pos & 0x1) *pix = col;
}
/* width of character */
font_pos++;
i = *font_pos;
return xoffset + i;
}
/*
* znode_start is the head of a btree of znodes, each with a linked list
* of GL display lists to draw (in list order).
*
* Draw this crap starting from biggest value znodes.
*/
static void draw_3dview (struct ZNode *node)
{
if (node == NULL) return;
if (node->more) draw_3dview (node->more);

if (use_renderer) {
printf (“Z=%d “, node->z);
Nu_DrawPrimitive (node->data);
}

if (node->less) draw_3dview (node->less);
printf(“draw_3dview\n”);
}

typedef void (*NU_DRAWFUNC) (void **);
NU_DRAWFUNC nu_drawfuncs[NU_MAX] = {
NULL,
&Nu_DrawTriangle,
&Nu_DrawQuad,
&Nu_DrawLine,
&Nu_DrawBezierLine,
&Nu_DrawTeardrop,
&Nu_DrawComplexSNext, // 6
&Nu_DrawComplexStart,
&Nu_DrawComplexEnd,
&Nu_DrawComplexStartInner, // 9
&Nu_DrawComplexBezier,
&Nu_DrawTwinklyCircle,
&Nu_DrawPlanet,
&Nu_DrawCircle,
&Nu_DrawCylinder,
&Nu_DrawBlob,
&Nu_DrawOval,
&Nu_DrawPoint,
&Nu_Draw2DLine
};

static void Nu_DrawPrimitive (void *data)
{
int fnum;

for (;;) {
fnum = znode_rdlong (&data);
//fprintf (stderr, “%d “, fnum);
if (!fnum) return;
nu_drawfuncs[fnum] (&data);
}
}

static inline int znode_rdlong (void **data)
{
int val = *((int*)(*data));
(*data) += 4;
return val;
}

static void add_node (struct ZNode **node, unsigned int zval)
{
assert (znode_buf_pos < MAX_ZNODES); /* end previous znode display list!!!!!!! */ if (znode_cur) end_node (); *node = znode_cur = &znode_buf[znode_buf_pos++]; znode_cur->z = zval;
znode_cur->less = NULL;
znode_cur->more = NULL;
znode_databegin ();
}

static inline void end_node ()
{
znode_wrlong (0);
}

static void znode_insert (struct ZNode *node, unsigned int zval)
{
if (zval > node->z) {
if (node->more) {
znode_insert (node->more, zval);
} else {
add_node (&node->more, zval);
}
} else {
if (node->less) {
znode_insert (node->less, zval);
} else {
add_node (&node->less, zval);
}
}
}

static inline void znode_databegin ()
{
znode_cur->data = &obj_data_area[obj_data_pos];
}

static inline void znode_wrlong (int val)
{
*((int*)(obj_data_area+obj_data_pos)) = val;
obj_data_pos+=4;
}

Sheepshaver

SheepShaver on Windows
SheepShaver on Windows

I was hoping for this to be a full featured review but alas there are a few major issues to prevent wide spread use of this emulator…

First you really need access to a Power Macintosh of some kind to use this. You’ll need a ROM and a version of the OS that isn’t for free on Apple’s site. Right now I’m using my 7.6.1 CD to run stuff, and it works great. Honestly its way better than the real deal.. Unless you are running something CPU intensive… Like SIMH on MiNT (all 68000 code) on Sheepshaver (PowerPC emulator)… it can be quirky at times.

However let me say if you do have MacOS 7.6 – 9 you’ll love Sheepshaver. If you feel left out from the PowerPC to Intel transition and feel you need this old clunker around to run some 68000 apps or even PowerPC system 7-9 applications that are not carbon compatible, sheepshaver is freaking AWESOME.

I’m still running Vista x86_64 on my laptop where I do most of my work, so for me I needed to download Sheepshaver. Now it does mention it can run MacOS 7.5.2 however the copy on apple’s site is a massive disk image… So you’ll need a Mac to extract it… Yeah I know.  I did make an ISO image to help those who need/want it.

I haven’t tried it, however I do know that 7.5.2 did *NOT* work on my 5400. The good news is that the disk images work between MiniVmac & Sheepshaver. This has saved my sanity (perhaps yours as well!) This does mean that you can also use HFVExplorer to move files in/out of Sheepshaver. A word of caution, the SLiRP networking causes my setup to crash… I really don’t know if it’s Vista 64, and I’m not in the mood to test within Virtual PC… emulating within an emulator is a recipe for disaster.

Another thing you’ll need is the GTK+ runtime for the gui configuration… I found mine by googling the term “gtk-2.12.9-win32-2.exe” … For some reason sourceforge seems to have issues at the moment with its projects unless you know exactly what you are looking for.

That being said I love sheepshaver. I run it full screen at my laptops native resolution (1280×800) and with the sound on, and it FEELS like a Macintosh Laptop. Even my 1.8Ghz laptop feels snappier than the 120Mhz PowerPC.. But from the Sheepshaver site, they do say to expect to run at 1/8th the speed.. So my laptop “feels” like it’s 225Mhz. A SCREAMER! Of course this would be horrible for people expecting to run photoshop & friends.

There is no doubt about it, Sheepshaver is great for running old games and applications.

A few tips though. Turn off Virtual memory in Sheepshaver. There is no need for it, as it’s far better to allow Sheepshaver to just have more memory.. In this day & age odds are you can easily allow it to have 64 – 256 megabytes. While you are unable to turn off the disk cache, you should tune it down to 64kb. Although the CPU isn’t much faster than many of the Power Mac’s, the disk IO of a modern computer far exceeds it. Most computers are actually IO bound, so running older systems with faster IO gives the appearance of them running substantially faster. It’s only nested emulation that brings it out how slow it is.

I’ve also found that older version of the OS support more software, and run better.  That is 7.5.3, 7.6, 8.0 and 8.1.  8.5, 8.6 and 9.0 have more PowerPC hooks in them, and SheepShaver hooks the 68000 code to do it’s paravirtualization (it doesn’t emulate any hardware), and the more older tied to the 68000 code tend to be more stable.

That being said, running Mathematica, SoftPC, and Photoshop would not be a “good idea” if you are expecting faster performance. But at the same time, it’s great being able to run old software that you’ve purchased throughout the years.