Cross compiling to i386 Linux ELF from OS X

This isn’t terribly useful for 99.9% of the people out there but I needed to do something creative on an F5.  Luckily they run a somewhat sane version of Linux.

Unfortunately I am stuck on Windows 10 right now, so installing a matching Linux distro is out of the question.  So on my OS X box, I thought I’d just build a cross compiler.  Going back to my DJGPP cross compiler, I thought I’d stick with binutils 2.9.1 and gcc 2.95.3, since they worked so well before.

Plus to flesh it out, you’ll want libc, libg++, and the appropriate Linux includes.  I took all of these from Slackware 3.3 since it’s from around that era.

So on the plus side this cross compiler + library set , will crank out static ELF executables, which makes running things on alien platforms all the better.

On the realistic side, I doubt anyone will need it, but here it is.

Clang didn’t want to build anything this old, but luckily that backported GCC-4.2 has no issues.

OpenWatcom v2

I know what you are thinking, wouldn’t it be great if you could create MS-DOS executables directly from a Win64 desktop with no MS-DOS needed?

Well, I just found out about this unofficial Open Watcom v2 project that targets the usual suspects, allows you to compile from Win64!

Hello World!

Hello World!

Some of the features of this fork include:

  • New 2-phase build system, OW can be build by platform native C/C++ compiler or by itself
  • Code generator properly initialize pointers by DLL symbol addresses
  • DOS version of tools now support long file names (LFN) if appropriate LFN driver is loaded by DOS
  • OW is ported to 64-bit hosts (WIN64, Linux X64)
  • Librarian support X64 CPU object modules and libraries
  • RDOS 32-bit C run-time compact memory model libraries are fixed
  • Resource compiler and Resource editors support WIN64 executables
  • OW text editor is now self containing, it can be used as standalone tool without any requirements for any additional files or configuration
  • Broken C++ compiler pre-compiled header template support is fixed
  • Many C++ compiler crashes are fixed
  • Debugger has no length limit for any used environment variable

Binaries are available on sourceforge.

So how does it fare?  I thought I’d take the old Wolf4GW, and compile it with this toolset.  The first hurdle I hit was this fun feature:

  • The C++ compiler now treats warning W737, implicit conversion of pointers to integral types of same size, as an error.

Which is an integral part of wl_menu.cpp .  So this was somewhat problematic, until I just commented out that block, and while I was expecting no working keyboard, I’m able to play, and load/save games…. Even the boss key works.

Wolf4GW

Wolf4GW

So with the W737 taken care of, I have to say this thing compiles FAST.  Incredibly FAST.  If for some reason you have to build 16bit or 32bit anything, you should look at a 64bit tool chain, well assuming you have a 64bit computer by now.

If anyone want’s to build their own Wolf4GW with the newer OpenWatcom, my source drop is here.

Now this reminds me of “turning the engine off and then back on again at 55 mph.”

the v86-64 patch, Allows you to enter v86 mode from long mode on a 64bit linux kernel.

Basically it works just like an old school DOS Extender, where it’ll switch from long mode, to 32bit compatible mode, then enter v86 mode run some code, then re-enter 32bit mode, to jump back into 64bit long mode.

From an old mailing list:

PERFORMANCE
This 64-bit DOSEMU compile runs substantially slower than the 32-bit compile
that I used previously on this computer.  I have several rather large
PowerBASIC/DOS programs that are, in fact, the main reason why I use DOSEMU.

Up until a couple of days ago, I had Fedora 7/i386 on this computer.  I just
happen to still have the numbers when compiling one of those programs with
PowerBASIC/DOS under DOSEMU:

With F7/i386:  1686600 lines per minute -- total time to compile the program:
0.2 seconds

With F8/x86_64:  230400 lines per minute -- total time to compile the program:
1.6 seconds.

The F8/x86_64 DOSEMU is running approximately 13 times slower.

Which I bet runs a bit faster than an old 386.

Solaris 11 came out today

They blew the 11/11/11 launch date.  I guess Oracle really just doesn’t care about magical numbers or whatever.

I guess for the two or three people who even run this stuff (no doubt to run Oralce and it’s draconian licensing) you can find out all about it here.

It appears they still keep the Fortran stuff around for it…  Oh and this release is x86_64 only.  Sorry 32bit users.

Installing gcc (and I imagine everything else) revolves around the pkg command… In this case ‘pkg install gcc-3’ will download and install gcc 3.  While ‘pkg install gcc-45’ will install GCC 4!.  Don’t forget to install system/header or you won’t have things like stdio.h!!

Another GCC tidbit, is that you can build 64bit binaries with GCC 4.5 by supplying the -m64 flag!

While Solaris 11 installs somewhat quickly in VirtualBox (but wow does it take forever to boot), it is bare minimum…

Also for those who want it, here is lynx & ircII for Solaris Oh and a Quake World Server.  At least wget is in the base, but I don’t see why lynx isn’t.

Super small 64bit OS

it doesn’t do much, but it does work!.. I saw it mentioned here, and the source archive can be downloaded here.

So I went through the steps of  building a 64bit cross tool to build it.. Although Qemu won’t boot the kernel directly, and it uses GRUB which isn’t so bad but I haven’t made a transparent boot system for it just yet…  Maybe I can use a CD-ROM ISO image…

C:\temp\trunk4>build
C:\temp\trunk4>del *.o kernel.bin kernel.ld
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-cpp -Iinclude -P -C -DLINKER_SCRIPT -o kernel.ld kernel.lds
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Iinclude -Xassembler --divide -c -o startup.o startup.S
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Wall  -nostdlib -nodefaultlibs -mcmodel=large -Iinclude -c -o kmain.o kmain.c
kmain.c: In function 'kmain':
kmain.c:17: warning: unused variable 'n'
kmain.c:15: warning: unused variable 'str'
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Wall  -nostdlib -nodefaultlibs -mcmodel=large -Iinclude -c -o idt.o idt.c
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Iinclude -Xassembler --divide -c -o isr.o isr.S
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Wall  -nostdlib -nodefaultlibs -mcmodel=large -Iinclude -c -o pic.o pic.c
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-gcc -Wall  -nostdlib -nodefaultlibs -mcmodel=large -Iinclude -c -o console.o console.c
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-ld -nodefaultlibs -z max-page-size=0x1000 -o kernel.bin -T kernel.ld startup.o kmain.o idt.o isr.o pic.o console.o
C:\temp\trunk4>x86_64-pc-elf-objdump -S kernel.bin  1>kernel.asm

The ‘warnings’ are all my fault… As I wanted a string not the 1,2,3,4…

Grub boot flags

 

And here we are in 64bit long mode!

So for the two or three people who care, my archive is here… I may move crap around, but at the same time building a 64bit cross compiler was a real chore.. More so because that x86_64-elf bare targets didn’t exist until some time around 4.3.2 which… is involved to build.

Qemu and 64bit windows…

It’s been a while since I’ve tried to run some 64bit versions of windows so I downloaded some from MSDN, and tried to run some under the latest 0.14.0 build

First up is Windows XP x64 sp2 (en_win_xp_pro_x64_with_sp2_vl_x13-41611.iso)

I launched it like this:

qemu-system-x86_64.exe -m 1024 -hda six64.disk -L pc-bios -cdrom en_win_xp_pro_x64_with_sp2_vl_x13-41611.iso

And the bootloader loads up, but it hangs transitioning to the kernel. Nothing is logged to the serial port.

qemu 0.14.0 windows xp sp6 x64

Next up is Windows 2003 server, with no service pack.

I’m loading up Qemu like this:

qemu-system-x86_64.exe -m 1024 -hda six64.disk -L pc-bios -cdrom \install\en_ws_2003_std_x64_vl.iso

And again being met with a hung state booting the kernel.

qemu 0.14.0 windows 2003 x64

I guess this isn’t surprising as booth 2003 & XP x86_64 both use the same kernel.

Next up, I thought I’d try a longhorn beta…

qemu-system-x86_64.exe -m 1024 -hda six64.disk -L pc-bios -cdrom longhorn-some-random-beta-x86_64.iso

qemu 0.14.0 longhorn 3016

And I get a nice black screen, again transitioning to the kernel…

So let’s try Windows 2008r2 (It’s the same thing as Windows 7).

qemu 0.14.0 windows 2008 r2 x86_64 crash

So this is different, so googling around for the Stop: 0x0000005D (0x0000000078BFBF9,0x0000000000000000,0x0000000000000000,0x0000000000000000 code, led me to some config file for the x86_64 for additional CPU types. It appears that in the arch_init.c file I modified the following line:

const char arch_config_name[] = CONFIG_QEMU_CONFDIR “/target-” TARGET_ARCH “.conf”;

Into:

const char arch_config_name[] = “./target-” TARGET_ARCH “.conf”;

So that way I could pick up the ” -cpu Nehalem ” flag. Sadly it produced…

qemu 0.14.0 windows 2008 r2 x86_64 crash nehelam

Bummer.

Meanwhile, much like Novell Netware, it really only works on Qemu 0.9.0

qemu 0.9.0 widnows xp x64 sp2 boot

qemu 0.9.0 windows 2008 r2 x86_64

But not so hot for Windows 2008 r2 (AKA Windows 7).

I’ve got to stop watching the blogger stats…

Because then I see something like this come my way as a query from google:

“is there a version of colossal cave adventure that runs on 64 bit systems”

Well I certainly can’t let that one go unanswered.

So whomever you are stranger, here it is. Well for Win64 x86_64 machines.

This is built using f2c on MinGW64. I’ll spare you the details, but it compiled, and fired up and I got lost in the woods… So I assume it is working…..

For those of you not in the know, colossal cave adventure, or sometimes known simply as ‘adventure’ is the grand daddy of all text adventure games.

As mentioned in this timeline of adventure versions, adventure was written by Willie Crowther and expanded by Don Woods. This version, the Kenneth Plotkin version was derived from Kevin Black’s DOS version and Bob Supnik’s Decus versions.

With that said, there is a tonne of INT2 and INT4 casting, which I’ve just removed as I’m passing it through f2c. I suppose I could have seen about fixing the variables, but I just fixed the ones f2c and gcc really complained about. Included in the download is the modified source, and the original source, so anyone can take a look at it.

Naturally Wikipedia has a most excellent article on the history of adventure, check it out.

Colossal Cave in 64bits!

Colossal Cave in 64bits!

Enjoy!

MinGW-w64

Well after yesterdays x86_64 excitement, I figured I’d take a look in the windows area to see about the 32bit vs 64bit performance on Windows…

I know this isn’t the ‘best’ test as I’m using VMWare Fusion on OS X and running Windows XP x64 sp2 (the 2007 edition, not the 2003 one).

If anyone wants to know how to get a 64bit gcc on windows, this is the best formula I’ve come up with so far.

First download a build of mingw-w64-bin_x86_64 from sourceforge… Right now I’m using a ‘Personal Build’ from sezero_20101003, because… it’s recent, and I would imagine a personal build has some hope of actually working.

I downloaded that, and extracted to the root of the C drive. Then I renamed the mingw64 to mingw.

Next up, I downloaded and installed MSYS 1.0.11, and installed that. I selected the default options, and of course specified my mingw is installed in

C:/mingw

After that, I install the MSYS DTK 1.0, again with default options.

The final part is some kind of editor, I like VIM but it’s… involved to download as the default package ‘vim-7.2-1-msys-1.0.11-bin.tar.lzma’ is in a 7zip compatible archive that needs a bit of tweaking to get a tar file out of. I can provide it here in gzip format, that you can simply extract within the msys command prompt in the /usr directory.

Now with all that done, you should be in business!

$ gcc -v
Using built-in specs.
Target: x86_64-w64-mingw32
Configured with: ../gcc44-svn/configure –host=x86_64-w64-mingw32 –target=x86_6
4-w64-mingw32 –disable-multilib –enable-checking=release –prefix=/mingw64 –w
ith-sysroot=/mingw64 –enable-languages=c,c++,fortran,objc,obj-c++ –enable-libg
omp –with-gmp=/mingw64 –with-mpfr=/mingw64 –disable-nls –disable-win32-regis
try
Thread model: win32
gcc version 4.4.5 20101001 (release) [svn/rev.164871 – mingw-w64/oz] (GCC)

 

But will it run Dungeon?

What is also cool, is that this build of mingw includes gfortran, which is a Fortran 95 compiler with various 2003 & 2008 enhancements. So for the heck of it, I’ve rebuilt the makefile from dungeon-2.5.6 and tweaked the machdep.f to at least call the ITIME function to get the current time. The resulting archive runs pretty well!

Windows XP x64 - dungeon

Yes, it runs! And without a *32 meaning this is a 64bit binary!

 

Onward with SIMH

So going back to SIMH as my benchmark, here is the vax780 with -O0/-O0

Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 18
This machine benchmarks at 27777 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 20
This machine benchmarks at 25000 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 19
This machine benchmarks at 26315 dhrystones/second

Which comparing it to the native x86_64 build is pretty good considering I’m running this in a VM (VMware Fusion!). Now the same test with -O1/-O1

Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second

Which is pretty good! Now for the finally with -O2/-O1

Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 12
This machine benchmarks at 41666 dhrystones/second

Which is interesting in that there is no appreciable difference in the -O2/-O1 vs the -O1/-O1 build. Although I kind of expect different results on a native machine. If anyone else cares to test, I’m going to make available the whole project here. This includes the source and the pre-built binaries.

Unzip it on a win64/win32 machine and it should be somewhat straightforward to build / run. You can alter the makefile and change the primary CC flags from O0 to O1 or O2 if you so wish… just run make and it’ll generate a vax780.exe . Then in the test directory you can bench your exe like this:

$ make
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_cpu.o VAX/vax_cpu.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_cpu1.o VAX/vax_cpu1.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 –
DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_fpa.o VAX/vax_fpa.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘op_cmpfd’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:210: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:210: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:211: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:211: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘op_cmpg’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:233: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:233: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:234: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:234: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘vax_fadd’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:371: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:373: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:386: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘unpackd’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:525: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:525: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘unpackg’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:540: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:540: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘norm’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:548: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:548: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:548: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:549: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:549: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:557: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘rpackfd’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:574: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c:575: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
VAX/vax_fpa.c: In function ‘rpackg’:
VAX/vax_fpa.c:597: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_cis.o VAX/vax_cis.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_octa.o VAX/vax_octa.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 –
DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_cmode.o VAX/vax_cmode.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64
-DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_mmu.o VAX/vax_mmu.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_sys.o VAX/vax_sys.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_syscm.o VAX/vax_syscm.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64
-DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_stddev.o VAX/vax780_stddev.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DU
SE_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_sbi.o VAX/vax780_sbi.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_mem.o VAX/vax780_mem.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_uba.o VAX/vax780_uba.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_mba.o VAX/vax780_mba.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_fload.o VAX/vax780_fload.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE
_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax780_syslist.o VAX/vax780_syslist.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 –
DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_rl.o PDP11/pdp11_rl.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_rq.o PDP11/pdp11_rq.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_ts.o PDP11/pdp11_ts.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_dz.o PDP11/pdp11_dz.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_lp.o PDP11/pdp11_lp.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_tq.o PDP11/pdp11_tq.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_xu.o PDP11/pdp11_xu.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_ry.o PDP11/pdp11_ry.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_cr.o PDP11/pdp11_cr.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_rp.o PDP11/pdp11_rp.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_tu.o PDP11/pdp11_tu.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_hk.o PDP11/pdp11_hk.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT
64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o PDP11/pdp11_io_lib.o PDP11/pdp11_io_lib.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 –
DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o scp.o scp.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX
-I PDP11
scp.c:470: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:470: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:470: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:470: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:471: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:471: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:471: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:471: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:472: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:472: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:472: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:472: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:473: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:473: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:473: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:473: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:474: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:474: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:474: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:474: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:475: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:475: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:475: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:475: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:476: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:476: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:477: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:477: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:478: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:478: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:479: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
scp.c:479: warning: integer constant is too large for ‘long’ type
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_console.o sim_console.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_fio.o sim_fio.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADDR6
4 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_timer.o sim_timer.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_A
DDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_sock.o sim_sock.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADD
R64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_tmxr.o sim_tmxr.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADD
R64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_ether.o sim_ether.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_A
DDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o sim_tape.o sim_tape.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DUSE_ADD
R64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O0 -c -o VAX/vax_cpu2.o VAX/vax_cpu2.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 –
DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -O1 -c -o VAX/vax_cpu2.o VAX/vax_cpu2.c -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64
-DUSE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11
gcc -o vax780 VAX/vax_cpu.o VAX/vax_cpu1.o VAX/vax_fpa.o VAX/vax_cis.o VAX/vax_
octa.o VAX/vax_cmode.o VAX/vax_mmu.o VAX/vax_sys.o VAX/vax_syscm.o VAX/vax780_st
ddev.o VAX/vax780_sbi.o VAX/vax780_mem.o VAX/vax780_uba.o VAX/vax780_mba.o VAX/v
ax780_fload.o VAX/vax780_syslist.o PDP11/pdp11_rl.o PDP11/pdp11_rq.o PDP11/pdp11
_ts.o PDP11/pdp11_dz.o PDP11/pdp11_lp.o PDP11/pdp11_tq.o PDP11/pdp11_xu.o PDP11/
pdp11_ry.o PDP11/pdp11_cr.o PDP11/pdp11_rp.o PDP11/pdp11_tu.o PDP11/pdp11_hk.o P
DP11/pdp11_io_lib.o scp.o sim_console.o sim_fio.o sim_timer.o sim_sock.o sim_tmx
r.o sim_ether.o sim_tape.o VAX/vax_cpu2.o -I. -DVM_VAX -DVAX_780 -DUSE_INT64 -DU
SE_ADDR64 -I VAX -I PDP11 -lwinmm -lwsock32

[email protected] /usr/src/simh
$ cd test/

[email protected] /usr/src/simh/test
$ ../vax780.exe bsd42.ini

VAX780 simulator V3.8-1
loading ra(0,0)boot
Boot
: ra(0,0)vmunix
199488+56036+51360 start 0x11a0
4.2 BSD UNIX #9: Wed Nov 2 16:00:29 PST 1983
real mem = 8384512
avail mem = 7073792
using 102 buffers containing 835584 bytes of memory
mcr0 at tr1
mcr1 at tr2
uba0 at tr3
hk0 at uba0 csr 177440 vec 210, ipl 15
rk0 at hk0 slave 0
rk1 at hk0 slave 1
uda0 at uba0 csr 172150 vec 774, ipl 15
ra0 at uda0 slave 0
ra1 at uda0 slave 1
zs0 at uba0 csr 172520 vec 224, ipl 15
ts0 at zs0 slave 0
dz0 at uba0 csr 160100 vec 300, ipl 15
dz1 at uba0 csr 160110 vec 310, ipl 15
dz2 at uba0 csr 160120 vec 320, ipl 15
dz3 at uba0 csr 160130 vec 330, ipl 15
root on ra0
WARNING: should run interleaved swap with >= 2Mb
Automatic reboot in progress…
Tue Nov 8 03:44:30 PST 1983
Can’t open checklist file: /etc/fstab
Automatic reboot failed… help!
erase ^?, kill ^U, intr ^C
# ./d2;./d2;./d2
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 19
This machine benchmarks at 26315 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 19
This machine benchmarks at 26315 dhrystones/second
Dhrystone(1.1) time for 500000 passes = 18
This machine benchmarks at 27777 dhrystones/second
# sync
# sync
# sync
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 80001629 (BNEQ 80001630)
sim> q
Goodbye

[email protected] /usr/src/simh/test
$

The d0,d1,d2 are the dhyrstone benchmark compiled with -O0, -O1, and -O2 respectively. This gives you a chance to observe various optimizations in the GCC 2.7.2.2 for the VAX.

More ports… more tradewars…

more etc…

Some of the stuff is getting ironed out, it plays better for sure.

I had to start separating things out to make some older C compilers happy…

I still do not understand how ‘float’ types keep changing sizes between 16bit/32bit compilers…. Was there ever ANY consistent floating point types in C between 16/32bit? It really sucks to have binary data and find out you cannot ‘read’ it…..

Did people just force people to dump their data into ASCII, and reload it into 32bit formats, and tell everyone to ONLY use 32bit?

I know I’m like 15 years late to this party, as everyone is going through the win32 to win64 thing… Although I’m surprised Tradewars C’s win64 version runs happily with a win32 generated data file…….

Oh and ports in this version:

MS-DOS (realmode)
Win16 (QuickC for Windows’s QuickWin)
Win32 (Visual C++ 1.0’s CLI libc.lib exe… )
Win64 (Visual Studio 2008 cli)
Linux (x86 built with debian -static…..)
OS/2 (16 bit built with Microsoft C 6)

Although it supports multiple users, it’s still a single player game… I suppose it shouldn’t be too hard to constantly check the user record & sector record of where they are with stuff changing…..?

Anyways my work is here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/tradewarsc/