6 thoughts on “Best video documentary on the G4 Cube I’ve seen so far

  1. I am a fan of this model. I never bought it simply because at the time I wasn’t an Apple fan (I just got my first MBP in 2010), and later when I knew about the G4 Cube, it was love at first sight. In 2014 was into Hackintoshes, and I wanted to do one with the G4 Cube, but never actually found a good one here in Brazil so I gave up.

    Today I wouldn’t do a hackintosh again, simply because it requires a tremendous amount of effort to make it work. I sold my hackintosh and got a 2013 rMBP 13”. Pretty satisfied so far.

    But I still keep an eye on the G4 Cube…

    • The cube was a nice compact Mac for it’s day, but it quickly was obsoleted. Much like the 2013 Mac Pro suffered the same fate, as it was built in a thermal ‘corner’ when the Xeon E5 v3’s were released and to match clock needed more power as they packed more cores, just as the cube needed active cooling to realistically go above 450Mhz (the 500 sure did overheat!).

      Both the Cube & the 2013 Pro put form over function, and punish the user for it. Neither are really that bad machines persay, rather it’s all in the complete lack of ‘where to go from here’ in the base unit, with the 2013 having the absolute worst upgrade path (basically none), although both teardowns really are delicate and risk destroying the machine.

      I took my 2013 down enough to get the video cards off, to at least put new paste on the GPU dies, and the first time I did this, the Mac wouldn’t boot at all, just throttle the fan to max. I tried to reseat the memory and push at the ribbons that are exposed and it chimes, but no video. I got lucky tearing it down again, and now it boots up okay.

      But the lock on the cylinder doesn’t clasp all the way.

      These machines are fragile.

      • Yikes. Glad you got the machine in a working state again. I do not think that the Mac Pro is a beautiful machine, but it’s not ugly either. All that power crammed into a tiny “recycle bin”… (pun intended)

        I’m about to replace the speakers of my rMBP Late 2013, since on of them has gone kaput and now makes a terrible noise on startup. I disabled the chime so I can have some relief till I fix it. I’ve ordered new speakers, should arrive today or tomorrow.

        According to iFixit, should be a fairly easy replacement (but you never know, my 2010 MBP is dead because a non-authorized apple repairer failed to fix its power issues, I’m pretty sure the motherboard got fried in the process.)

        I also need to replace the keyboard I think – the F1 to F9 keys are not working but I do not miss them at all. Plus I installed Karabiner to remap these keys. Karabiner was better than buying an expensive new keyboard to replace and I’ve seen videos showing that it’s one of the hardest parts to replace. You have to tear down the entire macbook to access it.

        A white 2009 macbook would be good enough for me at work if it weren’t for my gaming needs…

        • Gaming is where the 2013 falls hard. Two video cards and there is no crossfire. So basically one of the GPUs will never be used. Although that doesn’t stop it from getting hot as that shared heat sink sure evens the load.

          Not to mention that they are abandoning OpenGL. I guess even after killing 32bit they still had far too many applications and games still running.

          After Catalina they may as well move to Arm, but without Rosetta and just break what little remains.

  2. Before I clicked this post on my RSS reader I already know it’s going to be 65scribe. He’s one of the very few YouTubers I have the notification bell turned on 🙂
    His whole Macintosh review series is gold, honestly.

    • I’m only sad that I found out about him now. But his channel is WAY underrated. He channels that Red/Green aesthetic and very Ontarioian humor for sure.

      He’s inspired me to try to play marathon again.

      I don’t get the controls at all.

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